Contributors

Dr. Janice Forsyth

Dr. Audrey R. Giles

Dr. Audrey R. Giles

image175

My research experience lies in history and sociology, where I employ different concepts of power to identify and analyze the conditions that gave rise to specific practices related to Aboriginal physical culture in Canada. I focus specifically on the way organized physical activities have been used as tools for colonization and how Aboriginal people have responded to those efforts by taking up those same activities for cultural regeneration and survival. 

Dr. Audrey R. Giles

Dr. Audrey R. Giles

Dr. Audrey R. Giles

image176

Audrey, who is of English and Welsh heritage, is a Professor at the University of Ottawa in the School of Human Kinetics. She and her fabulous graduate students conduct community-based research with Indigenous communities, mostly in northern Canada. Her research examines the intersections of ethnicity, gender, and place, and the impacts these intersections have on participation in health promotion programs (e.g., sport for development) and injury prevention programs (e.g., boating safety, water safety, falls). Her research has been funded through SSHRC, CIHR, and a number of federal government departments. She was the 2018-2019 Fulbright Arctic Research Chair at Dartmouth College. More information on her research can be found at TeamGilesResearch.com

Dr. Joannie Halas

Dr. Audrey R. Giles

Dr. Joannie Halas

image177

Joannie Halas is a non-Indigenous Canadian and a professor of physical education at the University of Manitoba. Joannie's integrated teaching, research, and service promotes access to culturally affirming physical and health education for Indigenous youth. A key outcome of Joannie’s research is the international award winning Rec and Read/Indigenous Youth Mentorship Programs for All Nations. Joannie believes in the potential of physical education, sport and recreation as transformative pathways toward truth and reconciliation with Indigenous peoples in Canada.

Dr. Bruce Kidd

Dr. Tricia McGuire-Adams

Dr. Joannie Halas

image178

Bruce Kidd is a non-Indigenous Canadian and a professor of kinesiology and physical education at the University of Toronto. He has been interested in Indigenous sport ever since he was honoured by the Council Fire of the Iroquois Confederacy, as a young athlete in 1963, as an Honorary Warrior and Runner of Messages, and he is deeply committed to the realization of the TRC Calls to Action, especially #87-91, about Indigenous sport. He has long been a supporter of the Tom Longboat Awards and is a member of the National Selection Committee. 

Dr. Robert Kossuth

Dr. Tricia McGuire-Adams

Dr. Tricia McGuire-Adams

image179

Rob Kossuth is a non-Indigenous Canadian and an associate professor in the department of Kinesiology and Physical Education at the University of Lethbridge. Primarily his research focuses on the history of sport, recreation and leisure in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century Canada. Recent and ongoing research centres on physical culture on Canada’s prairies with a particular interest in relations in local colonized settings between First Nations and settlers.

Dr. Tricia McGuire-Adams

Dr. Tricia McGuire-Adams

Dr. Tricia McGuire-Adams

image180

Dr. Tricia McGuire-Adams (from Bingwi Neyaashi Anishinaabek in the Robinson Superior Treaty Territory) is an Assistant Professor in the Faculties of Kinesiology, Sport, & Recreation and Native Studies at the University of Alberta. Through her research, she uses an Anishinaabeg Research Paradigm and created an Anishinaabeg research methodology, Wiisokotaatiwin. Wiisokotaatiwin (meaning gathering together for a purpose, and was shared with me by the people in Naicatchewenin First Nation), gathered urban Indigenous women together to participate in critical dialogues and engage in directed physical activity. Tricia has meaningful experience working with Indigenous organizations in areas as such as community based research, community justice, post-secondary education, and women’s issues. 

Taylor McKee

Dr. Christine O'Bonsawin

Dr. Christine O'Bonsawin

image181

 Taylor McKee is a non-Indigenous doctoral candidate studying at the University of Western Ontario under the supervision of Dr. Janice Forysth. Taylor's research focuses on media, violence, and sport in Canadian history and assists the research team by creating and curating this website.   

Dr. Christine O'Bonsawin

Dr. Christine O'Bonsawin

Dr. Christine O'Bonsawin

image182

 Christine O’Bonsawin (Abenaki Nation, Odanak) is an Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies and History at the University of Victoria. Her scholarship in Indigenous studies and sport history takes up questions regarding the appropriation and subjugation of Indigenous peoples, identities, and cultures in Olympic history and the future programming of the Games. Christine’s recent scholarship has mainly focused on the legal and political rights of Indigenous peoples in settler colonial Canada, particularly in hosting the Olympic Games on treaty lands as well as those territories that remain treaty-less (unceded).  

Dr. Vicky Paraschak

Dr. Vicky Paraschak

Dr. Vicky Paraschak

image183

Vicky Paraschak is a non-Indigenous Canadian and a professor in Kinesiology at the University of Windsor. She has researched Indigenous sport matters in Canada throughout her career, and is currently committed to addressing TRC Calls to Action and in particular #87 through Wikipedia and other forms of public education. She sees this website as an opportunity to tell the national story of Indigenous athletes in Canada in a way that can be easily accessed by interested individuals.    

Dr. Braden Te Hiwi

Dr. Vicky Paraschak

Dr. Vicky Paraschak

image184

Braden Te Hiwi is Assistant Professor of Indigenous Studies at UBC. As a Maori (Ngati Raukawa and Rangitane) of the Manawatu region of Aotearoa/New Zealand, he is happy to live and work as a guest on the unceded and traditional territories of the Syilx peoples in the interior of British Columbia.  Braden believes in two different, but complementary, approaches to research on Indigenous peoples’ health and physical activity. The first is the necessity of Indigenous approaches, knowledge, strengths, and aspirations in Indigenous research. Secondly, he believes Indigenous scholarship should be contextualized within a critical understanding of the historical legacy and contemporary effects of colonialism.